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Why Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Crucial

By |2019-05-07T09:24:45-05:00October 31st, 2016|

An estimated 18 million Americans are living with sleep apnea, that equals about 1 out of every 15 Americans. Data shows that of those, approximately 1 out of every 50 Americans have an undiagnosed case of sleep apnea. It’s a problem that has reached near epidemic proportions. The problem goes well beyond simply not getting a good night’s sleep...

Obstructive Sleep Apnea: More Than A Bad Night’s Sleep

By |2018-01-08T12:28:07-05:00October 27th, 2016|

Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep disorder where breathing repeatedly starts and stops due to upper airway obstruction (pictured below). These interruptions in breathing are called apneas. People who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea commonly experience excessive daytime sleepiness, morning headaches, abrupt awakenings, and reduced work performance. Obstructive sleep apnea can also bring about other issues including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and depression, which when paired with sleep apnea, can be associated with increased ...

Do You Have the Signs of Sleep Apnea?

By |2018-01-08T12:30:04-05:00October 20th, 2016|

The signs of sleep apnea are often overlooked by physicians and patients alike. Why? Because they are very broad and can be mistaken for signs of other problems. One of the most common amd easily identified signs of sleep apnea is loud and ongoing snoring...

What is Sleep Apnea? A Guide for Patients

By |2018-01-08T12:31:10-05:00October 13th, 2016|

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing or instances of shallow breathing while you sleep, called apneas. It often goes undiagnosed due to its broad symptoms. Each apnea can last anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes and may occur 30+ times each hour. During these pauses, your airway relaxes and you are unable to receive enough air to your lungs, causing snoring...

Sleep Disorder Comorbidities: Are You at Risk?

By |2018-01-08T12:34:27-05:00October 10th, 2016|

A patient is said to have comorbidities when he/she has multiple coexisting diseases. In the United States, about 80% of Medicare spending is devoted to patients with 4 or more chronic conditions. Sleep disorders present medical comorbidities quite frequently. Disorders like insomnia and hypersomnia are highly comorbid with conditions such as chronic pain and diabetes. Here are some of the most common conditions found in sleep disordered breathing patients...